One in three people in the world suffers from malnutrition in one of its forms: unintentional weight loss due to hunger, stunting, vitamin and mineral deficiencies, overweight or obesity, and diet-related non-communicable diseases.

The World Health Organization (WHO)

Issued on 31/8/18, a note on Healthy Diet betting on the Healthy Diet to combat malnutrition and non-communicable diseases (being the most widespread diabetes, heart disease, stroke and cancer) and noting that unhealthy diets and lack of physical activity are the main risk factors for health.

The World Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO)

It recognizes that chemical agriculture developed in the twentieth century to increase agricultural productivity, in addition to not eliminating the problem of hunger, has generalized a food model harmful to health, in addition to producing deforestation, water scarcity and pollution, loss of biodiversity, soil depletion and high greenhouse gas emissions.

Today, FAO is committed to a transition to Sustainable Food and Agricultural Systems that guarantee Food Security and Nutrition to all people, and to Agroecology as the best way of transition from Industrial Agriculture and Globalized Food to Ecological Agriculture and Food based on Family Farming, Local and Seasonal Consumption.

The United Nations Agenda for 2030

With 17 Sustainable Development Objectives (SDOs) and 169 Goals, it incorporates FAO’s commitment to agroecology, including a comprehensive and synergistic view of these objectives, and calls on governments to develop policies that foster cooperation between administrations, private and social entities to achieve them.

Industrial Food

It loses credibility among consumers while supporting this UN Agenda.
Perhaps for this reason, the media groups of communication echo the opinions and messages of communicators, biologists, nutritionists, agronomists and supposed researchers discrediting Ecological Food with half-truths, falsehoods and research paid for by the agrochemical-pharmaceutical complex that do not reveal their data protected by trade secrets.

Perhaps for this reason, media groups of communication echo the opinions and messages of communicators, biologists, nutritionists, agronomists and supposed researchers discrediting Ecological Food with half-truths, falsehoods and research paid for by the pharmaceutical agrochemical complex that do not reveal their data under cover of commercial secrecy.

This proliferation of smear campaigns to sow mistrust among consumers says more about their fear of losing market than their truth.

The WHO, the FAO and the ODS have put healthy child nutrition on the international agenda. Preventing malnutrition and the growth of obesity associated with poor nutrition reduces mortality, morbidity and health costs.

But it is also an act of social justice because these diseases affect more children, women, the poor, displaced and immigrants. The most accessible and cheapest food – but also the one with the lowest nutritional quality – is the one that provides the most business to the multinationals that control the globalized food market and distribution chains.

The first 5 years of life are essential to establish healthy habits and school, the privileged place to do so. Boys and girls, with the help of educators, build their personality and socialize with their peers at school. Food during these years is a nutritious, affective moment of personal and social development.

The WHO recommends:

  • Exclusive breastfeeding from the first hour of life to 6 months, prolong as much as possible, at least until 2 years.
  • From the age of 6 months, progressive introduction of nutritious and innocuous foods.
  • Do not add salt or sugar to their diet. To take care of the feeding in the infantile school (from 0 to 3 years old), besides using extra virgin olive oil and not adding salt nor sugar, implies to reduce animal protein to what is necessary (between 20 and 40 grams daily between 1 and 3 years old), to increase the variety and quantity of vegetables and fruits, specially of season, to increase the legumes up to 4 days a week, to substitute cereals and refined flours by integral and to eliminate processed, sausages and fried foods.